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Bringing a vessel to Australia or going on an overseas voyage

If you're planning to bring a vessel to Australia, or take a domestic commercial vessel (DCV) on an overseas voyage, you need to comply with Australian regulations and international standards.  

 

Instructions for:

  • ship owners and operators
  • shipping companies, shipping agents and ship builders acting on behalf of ship owners/operators.
Don’t leave it to the last minute. Bringing a vessel to Australia or taking a vessel on an overseas voyage often involves transferring a DCV to a regulated Australian vessel (RAV), or vice versa. This takes time and involves both AMSA and AMSA-appointed recognised organisations (ROs).


Four common scenarios

Scenario 1: Bringing a vessel that is overseas to Australia

Example: You have purchased a vessel overseas or have had a vessel built overseas, and want to bring it to Australia and operate it as either a DCV or a RAV.

Requirements vary depending on how you are planning to bring your vessel to Australia. Find out the requirements for:

Scenario 2: A DCV undertaking a one-time overseas voyage

Example: You want to take a DCV overseas for dry docking, sale or delivery.

See instructions for DCVs undertaking a one-time overseas voyage.


Scenario 3: A DCV intends to operate commercially overseas on an ongoing basis

Example: You no longer want to operate your commercial vessel domestically, and want to transfer to commercial operations internationally.

See instructions for DCVs that intend to operate commercially overseas on an ongoing basis.


Scenario 4: A RAV no longer wants to operate on international voyages 

Example: You no longer want to operate your commercial vessel (RAV) internationally and want to transfer to domestic commercial operations in Australia.

See instructions for RAVs that no longer want to operate on international voyages.

Last updated: 

Thursday 14 December 2023