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Engine International Air Pollution Prevention (EIAPP) certificates and Technical Files

To confirm an engine with a power output of greater than 130 kilowatts (kW) is compliant with emission standards, it must be accompanied by an Engine International Air Pollution Prevention (EIAPP) certificate and supporting Technical File.

EIAPP certificates provide evidence that an engine complies with NOx emission standards. An EIAPP certificate is issued to a marine diesel engine following successful NOx emissions testing and survey, in line with the NOx Technical Code. 

Each EIAPP certificate comes with a supplement/supporting Technical File containing details on:  

  • engine components 
  • settings that influence NOx emissions 
  • allowable engine adjustments 
  • on-board NOx verification procedures. 

This information is important for compliance purposes and must be kept on board with the engine throughout its life on the vessel. 

Requirements for marine diesel engines on domestic commercial vessels (DCV) 

Domestic Australian vessels must have on board an EIAPP certificate and Technical File for each marine diesel engine greater than 130kW installed on the vessel after 31 December 2022 or that undergo a major conversion after 31 December 2022. 

Requirements for marine diesel engines on regulated Australian vessels (RAV) 

Regulated Australian vessels must have on board an EIAPP certificate and Technical File for each marine diesel engine greater than 130kW installed on the vessel. These requirements have applied since 2007.  

Requirements for marine diesel engines on recreational vessels 

Recreational vessels must have on board an EIAPP certificate and Technical File for each marine diesel engine greater than 130kW installed on the vessel. These requirements have applied since 2007.  

Engine family or group certificates 

NOx testing and certification for an engine family or group of serially manufactured engines is permitted to avoid certification testing of every engine for compliance with the NOx emission limits. 

Supplying an EIAPP certificate 

From 1 January 2023, engine suppliers and anyone who carries out a major conversion on a marine diesel engine will be required to provide an EIAPP certificate (and supporting Technical File) for each marine diesel engine with a power output above 130kW sold for installation on:  

  • domestic Australian vessels; or  
  • recreational vessels not issued with an International Air Pollution Prevention (IAPP) Certificate confirming that an EIAPP is held for each relevant marine diesel engine – this includes recreational vessels that do not undertake overseas voyages, or are less than 400GT and undertaking overseas voyages. 

What is a major conversion? 

A major conversion means a modification of a marine diesel engine where:  

  • the engine is replaced by a marine diesel engine that is not an identical replacement or an additional marine diesel engine is installed, or 
  • any substantial modification, as defined in the NOx Technical Code, is made to the engine; or 
  • the maximum continuous rating of the engine is increased by more than 10% compared to the maximum continuous rating of the original certification of the engine. 

Find out more 

Last updated: 

Friday 23 December 2022